Zelezny Brod Sklo by Frantisek Zemek Neodymium Colour-Changing Art Glass Vase, 1960s-70s, Czech

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Zelezny Brod Sklo by Frantisek Zemek Neodymium Colour-Changing Art Glass Vase, 1960s-70s, Czech - Anye's Attic
Zelezny Brod Sklo by Frantisek Zemek Neodymium Colour-Changing Art Glass Vase, 1960s-70s, Czech - Anye's Attic
Zelezny Brod Sklo by Frantisek Zemek Neodymium Colour-Changing Art Glass Vase, 1960s-70s, Czech - Anye's Attic
Zelezny Brod Sklo by Frantisek Zemek Neodymium Colour-Changing Art Glass Vase, 1960s-70s, Czech - Anye's Attic
Zelezny Brod Sklo by Frantisek Zemek Neodymium Colour-Changing Art Glass Vase, 1960s-70s, Czech - Anye's Attic
Zelezny Brod Sklo by Frantisek Zemek Neodymium Colour-Changing Art Glass Vase, 1960s-70s, Czech - Anye's Attic
Zelezny Brod Sklo by Frantisek Zemek Neodymium Colour-Changing Art Glass Vase, 1960s-70s, Czech - Anye's Attic
Zelezny Brod Sklo by Frantisek Zemek Neodymium Colour-Changing Art Glass Vase, 1960s-70s, Czech - Anye's Attic
Zelezny Brod Sklo by Frantisek Zemek Neodymium Colour-Changing Art Glass Vase, 1960s-70s, Czech - Anye's Attic
Zelezny Brod Sklo by Frantisek Zemek Neodymium Colour-Changing Art Glass Vase, 1960s-70s, Czech - Anye's Attic
Zelezny Brod Sklo by Frantisek Zemek Neodymium Colour-Changing Art Glass Vase, 1960s-70s, Czech - Anye's Attic

THE ITEM
This beautiful biomorphic piece was designed in 1957 is by Czech art glass designer Frantisek Zemek (b. 1913 - d. 1960). This design is an early example of Zemek's creativity and was deemed important enough to be included by Josef Raban in his landmark book ‘Modern Bohemian Glass’, published in 1963. (- source: Mark Hill) 

This piece is not only special in its abstract and organic bottle form - which gives it additional ability to refract light - it also has the ability to colour change. 

The colour changing ability comes from Neodymium, a chemical element which is incorporated into the glass during the crafting process. Neodymium glass is sometimes known as Alexandrite glass and under daylight, the element in the glass is a pale lilac colour. However, under indoor and fluorescent household lighting. the element becomes a pale blue colour. 

The abstract bottle form of this piece is finished with an accent of clear trailings of glass. The trailing begins at the neck of the vase, winding downwards to curl around the middle of the vase. This elegant piece would suit a room with Mid Century, Modernist or even Contemporary inspired decor.

CONDITION

Excellent, no chips or cracks or repairs. There is mild wear that is commensurate with the age of the piece. Wear is most evident in movement marks and one flake on the underside of the vase's base that is not visible when the vase is upright - please refer to photos as part of the condition report.

MEASUREMENTS
Height c. 7.7" / 19.5 cm x c. 5.1" / 13 cm in width (across the widest point). Base diameter: c. 1.6" / 4 cm. Unpackaged weight: 648 g / 0.7 kg

NOTES
Vase will be securely packaged and shipping will be insured.
Shipping will be combined for multiple items.

A BIT OF HISTORY

Frantisek Zemek (b. 1913 - d. 1960) 

"... Zemek is arguably one of the lost great names in 20th-century glass design and was key to the development of hot-worked glass in Czechoslovakia.
Starting his career as a glass cutter for the Inwald group, he went on to study at the Zelezny Brod glass school, and then under the renowned Professor Karel Stipl. He worked at the Chrìbska factory in 1949, followed by the Zelezny Brod factory from 1952-57. He was also concurrently the head designer for the Mstisov factory from 1956-59. His early death in a motorcycle accident in 1960 cut off what looked to be a promising career, given his influence in the 1950s." 

- Source: Mark Hill, British antiques expert

Železný Brod is an old glass-producing town founded in the eleventh century. It was originally known as Brod ("ford") or Brodek ("little ford"). Železný ("iron") was added to its name in the fourteenth century, alluding to the town's steelworks. The town's main industry is represented by producers of blow-moulded glass, as well as that of jewellers. The Železný Brod (ZBS) glassworks was created in 1948 as a result of nationalisation, at the time, this was made up of 9 glass factories in the town.