Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s

Regular price £288.00 Save £-288.00
1 in stock
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s
Tremaen Lighting Peter Ellery for Tremaen Studio, Nanceddan Series, Sculptural Cornish Pebble Lamp Base, 1970s

This elegantly sculptural, hand-built, and glazed studio pottery piece is of British Modernist design and by Peter Ellery for his Cornish pottery studio Tremaen Pottery (1965 - 1988). Ellery's work features a heavy influence of the Cornish environment that the Tremaen studio was based in. Sea-washed pebbles, rocks, and boulders shaped form, and Cow Parsley from abundant hedgerows inspired décor, as are traces of rough-hewn stone harbour walls and whitewashed fishermen's cottages. Many pieces have an organic feel, being deliberately weathered or textured.

This particular piece comes from the Nanceddan (Cornish for 'Valley of the Birds') series, reflecting the influences of the Cornish coastal landscape in its sea-smoothed pebble form, texture and palette. As with Ellery's other works, this piece would have been constructed as well as glazed with unconventional techniques, as was Ellery's style. The overall composition is characterised by its exceptionally tactile and organic qualities, shaped like a stone smoothed by the ocean tide revealing the layers of its inner strata. The glazing is textured and touch inviting, the palette begins with a base of the natural stoneware clay in matte Sand that is then elevated with the silky bands of semi-matte glaze in tones of Warm Honey and Caramel brown.

This stunning piece actualises many key principles of Modernist design influence, with a focus on combining function with bringing forth the beauty in the natural material.

CONDITION
Excellent. No chips, cracks, or repairs. There is faint wear to the protective felting on the underside of the base that is commensurate with the age of the piece. Please see photographs as they form part of the condition report. The underside of the base is fitted with protective felting and also bears Tremaen's original label.

MEASUREMENTS
Height: c. 11.4" / 29 cm high (excluding bulbholder) c. 14.2" / 36 cm (including bulbholder). Width c. 6.7" / 17 cm (across the widest point) x depth: c. 4.7" / 12 cm. Base measurements: c. 5.9" / 15 cm x c. 4.2" / 10.6 cm. Weight: c. 1.6 kg / 1,620 g. Length of cord: c. 83.5" / 212 cm. Lamp takes standard A-series Bayonet bulb.

NOTES
Lamp will be securely packaged and shipping will be insured. Shipping will be combined for multiple items.

A BIT OF HISTORY
Peter Ellery, Tremaen Pottery (1965 - 1988)
Tremaen pottery was first set up by Peter Ellery in Marazion, UK in 1965, typically creating large scale pieces using unconventional techniques in both construction and glazing. His work quickly gained appreciation and popularity, and within 2 years Tremaen pottery moved to a larger premises in Newlyn with the workforce expanding to twelve to cope with demand.

Although work continued to be by hand, the range of pieces produced by Tremaen expanded to include smaller scale and figural pieces. Tremaen's work maintained its popularity but sadly, the recession of the early 1980s created increasing economic difficulties. Ellery sustained Tremaen's production until 1988 where he made the decision to close the pottery.