Chribska att Josef Hospodka Mid Century 'Open / Collared Heart' Pink, Green and White Art Glass Vase

Regular price £54.00 Save £-54.00
Chribska att Josef Hospodka Mid Century 'Open / Collared Heart' Pink, Green and White Art Glass Vase - Anye's Attic
Chribska att Josef Hospodka Mid Century 'Open / Collared Heart' Pink, Green and White Art Glass Vase - Anye's Attic
Chribska att Josef Hospodka Mid Century 'Open / Collared Heart' Pink, Green and White Art Glass Vase - Anye's Attic
Chribska att Josef Hospodka Mid Century 'Open / Collared Heart' Pink, Green and White Art Glass Vase - Anye's Attic
Chribska att Josef Hospodka Mid Century 'Open / Collared Heart' Pink, Green and White Art Glass Vase - Anye's Attic
Chribska att Josef Hospodka Mid Century 'Open / Collared Heart' Pink, Green and White Art Glass Vase - Anye's Attic
Chribska att Josef Hospodka Mid Century 'Open / Collared Heart' Pink, Green and White Art Glass Vase - Anye's Attic
Chribska att Josef Hospodka Mid Century 'Open / Collared Heart' Pink, Green and White Art Glass Vase - Anye's Attic
Chribska att Josef Hospodka Mid Century 'Open / Collared Heart' Pink, Green and White Art Glass Vase - Anye's Attic
Chribska att Josef Hospodka Mid Century 'Open / Collared Heart' Pink, Green and White Art Glass Vase - Anye's Attic
Chribska att Josef Hospodka Mid Century 'Open / Collared Heart' Pink, Green and White Art Glass Vase - Anye's Attic

THE ITEM
This superb work of Modernist sculpted art glass is by Czech glassworks Chribska. The design is attributed glass artist and Chribska Chief Designer Josef Hospodka (b. 1923 - d. 1989) who specialised in sculptural blown glass designs. 

Organic in form with softly exaggerated curves, this piece has a rare shape that could be regarded as an abstract heart that is open or collared at the apex. Captured at the core of this piece rich well of cranberry pink that becomes paler and translucent towards the centre of the clear glass. Blown into the pink is swell of pale pistachio green that extends to the 'neck' or 'collar' of the piece. The work is finished with a band or 'collar' of opaque white that is trimmed with a deep green. 

An excellent work of art glass to complement a collection or displayed standalone for a pop of vibrant colour. 

CONDITION

Very Good. There is negligible age and use wear that is most prominent in movement marks to the underside of the base and is commensurable with age - please refer to photos as part of the condition report.

MEASUREMENTS
Height c 4.7" /  12 cm x c. 6.1" / 15.5 cm width (across the widest point) x c. 2" / 5 cm depth. Weight c. 1.0 kg / 1,000 g

NOTES
Glass will be securely packaged and shipping will be insured.
Shipping will be combined for multiple items.

A BIT OF HISTORY
Glassworks Chřibská, whose logo shows the date 1414, is considered to be the oldest glassworks in the world and was operated without interruption for almost six centuries. The glassworks full name Sklarna Chribska was based in the Czech Republic and known for their sculptural art glass vases and bowls, they remained in production until very recently. Chribska became part of the Borske Sklo National Corporation during the 1950s.

Josef Hospodka (1923-89) studied at the State School for Graphic Arts in Prague from 1938-40, followed by the School for Decorative Arts in Prague from 1940-45 under Professor Holecek. He was the head of the glass cutting department at the Specialised School for Glassmaking at Novy Bor from 1945-51, headmaster at the Chribskà glassworks training school from 1951-58, and head designer at the Borské Sklo glassworks from 1858-60, and from 1964-70. He is best known for his many highly successful and prolifically produced colourful and curving hot-worked designs produced for Chribskà, of which he was a director from 1960-64.

Hospodka is best known at Chribská for his brightly coloured organic forms designed from the mid-1950s-60s and inspired by glass produced on Murano. However, he was considerably more inventive, and utilised fully the hot-working talents of the glassmakers at Chribská." 

- Source: Mark Hill